Gone Global: 4 Australian Influencers You Need To Know About

Gone Global is a Collabary series that aims to study the role of influencer marketing in regions outside of Europe and the West. By exploring influencers, campaigns, and trends in markets such as China, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, and India, we can not only find inspiration from the exciting ideas coming out of some of the most lively and expanding economies in the world, but celebrate their cultures and the diversity of human creativity.

Australia is a nation and continent in the Pacific known globally for its diverse and beautiful landscapes, exotic plant and animal life, and the laid-back lifestyle of its multicultural inhabitants. As the oldest continent on Earth, Australia has a rich history that stems back to the dawn of mankind, from the migration of its indigenous Australians all the way to European colonization. 

A highly-developed country with a high-income economy, Australia’s consumer culture is propped up by a shared wealth and economic freedom. With a population of 25.5 million spread out over its vast land-mass, 88% of its population is online, Australia’s location in the burgeoning Asia-Pacific economic region and its modern and diverse culture makes it the perfect place to study in our series of global influencer marketing trends.

In this post, the seventh in our Gone Global explorations of influencer marketing after the Middle East, China, Latin America, India, Russia and Africa, we have again chosen to cover four local influencers that we feel represent the most interesting and educational facets of marketing trends in the country and why they are worth paying close attention to.

 

1. Sam Evans 

Photo credit: Sam Evans

Sam Evans is a Sydney-based travel blogger, videographer and influencer who has built up a fan base of 163k followers on Instagram. A self-described adventurer, Sam has been sharing his travels with his fans on Instagram and Youtube in beautifully shot and edited films since 2016. 

His restless spirit, personality, and individual talent have made him a sought after collaborator by numerous local and international brands. He has worked with brands as varied as Nike, British Airways, Land Rover and GoPro, but his work with Audi has perhaps been the most enduring. For the last two years, Sam’s travels have heavily featured Audi’s range of sports cars and explorers, proving that versatility of the brand – whether trekking through the ice-capped Austrian Alps, the American wilderness or the Australian coast.

Sam’s appeal on both YouTube and Instagram makes sense when considering the statistics. While Facebook remains to be the most popular social network, YouTube attracts 15 million unique Australian visitors a month and is used by 1 in 2 Australians daily. Instagram, on the other hand, attracts over 9 million unique monthly users. With such a content-hungry local audience at his back, it’s no wonder why so many international brands are looking to capitalize on his undeniable content creation skills.

 

2. Kayla Itsines 

Photo credit: Kayla Itsines

Kayla Itsines is an Adelaide-based fitness instructor, author, health-advocate and influencer who with 11.8 million followers is currently one of the top influencers in the country. Since she began posting on Instagram in 2013, Itsines has since grown to create a fitness empire of sorts, with her books and self-made fitness plans having now led millions of people around the world to live healthier lives. Her efforts have paid off, with both Kayla and her husband being ranked highly on Australian Financial Review’s Young Rich List of 2018.

As well as leading her own brands, Itsines has frequently collaborated with other health and fitness brands that align with her message. In 2016, she was the first Australian influencer to be included in an Apple campaign outlining the health features of the Apple Watch. Outside of this, she continues to collaborate with the Australian activewear online marketplace Stylerunner and Under Armour. 

Itsines’ meteoric rise to popularity in Australia is understandable. The country has a reputation for being health-and-fitness-focused, with the fitness industry expected to grow to $1.64 billion USD by 2023. Online spending on food and personal care is also up 25% between 2017-2018. With the importance of online advertising more important now than ever, it’s no wonder that the Audited Media Association of Australia, an independent and highly respected media measurement group, has launched a dedicated council to create a solid framework of practice standards in influencer marketing.

 

3. Elle Ferguson 

Photo credit: Elle Ferguson

Elle Ferguson is a self-described digital entrepreneur and influencer based in Sydney. With a following of 674k on Instagram, her rise began over a decade ago when she set up a now-defunct fashion blog with her former-best friend Tash Sefton TheyAllHateUs. Elle is best-known for embodying the Bondi beach aesthetic, with the influencer going as far as to create her own line of tanning products.

Elle Ferguson frequently collaborates with major international fashion labels and brands, including H&M and Vera Wang. However, her global appeal hasn’t stopped her from collaborating with local brands, including Spell, Ksubi and a two-time design partnership with surfwear brand Billabong.

Elle Ferguson’s enduring popularity in the industry has evolved simultaneously with Australia’s e-commerce industry. With 18 million Australians now using social media (up 6.7%) and 87% of Australia’s population using smartphones, the consumer goods e-commerce market has exploded in recent years – with the industry having increased by 22% last year to now be worth US$18.63 billion. With 69% of the population having purchased a product online in the last year (up 2.3%) and fashion and beauty up 26%, influencers driving the fashion sector have never been more valuable.

 

4. Samantha Harris

Photo credit: Samantha Harris 

Samantha Harris is a model and influencer who has amassed a following of 68.4k followers on Instagram. Samantha is a member of Australia’s indigenous community, which despite being one of the oldest cultures in the world and being based in one of the world’s richest countries, is particularly disenfranchised. Outside of her modeling and ambassador work, Sam has used her platform to raise awareness about indigenous affairs and promote charitable initiatives.

Samantha Harris often collaborates with well-known local brands, frequently adding her face to campaigns by Bonds underwear, Holden cars, Sass and Bide and department store chain David Jones. Her natural beauty has also made her a great ambassador for Californian plant-based foods company Califia Farms with whom she has collaborated with for the past year.

It makes sense why Harris has attracted so many local brands. Research from a local influencer marketing firm found that of Australia’s Top 200 influencers, an average engagement rate of 5.48% was achieved. Considering the global average on all Instagram users content is roughly 3%, this goes to show that Australian audiences are both curious about and engaged with influencer marketing. 

 

Summary

By taking note of influencer marketing trends in Australia, brands can ensure that their methods of marketing in the region are culturally relevant and effective. To summarize:

• 88% of Australia’s population of 25.5 million is online

• YouTube attracts 15 million unique Australian visitors a month and is used by 1 in 2 Australians daily. Instagram attracts over 9 million unique monthly users

• Australia’s fitness industry is expected to grow to $1.64 billion USD by 2023. Online spending on food and personal care is also up 25% between 2017-2018

• The Audited Media Association of Australia, an independent and highly respected media measurement group, has launched a dedicated council focusing on establishing and rating the best influencer marketing

• 18 million Australians use social media and 87% of Australia’s population using smartphones

• The Australian e-commerce market has increased by 22% in the last year and is now worth US$18.63 billion

• 69% of the population has purchased a product online in the last year. The online fashion and beauty sector is up 26%

• Out of Australia’s Top 200 influencers, an average engagement rate of 5.48% was achieved. The global average engagement rate on all Instagram users’ content is roughly 3%